1. voyageur-voyageuse:

    Rush Hour at Waterloo Station is condensed into three minutes in this breakneck short. Entitled, originally enough, Rush Hour, this great work of cinematography gives you some sense of what train travel was like in the morning hours of some day in 1970. 

    Rush Hour is one of my favourite short films (it helps that it’s about trains!)

     

  2. This is a repeat of my previous post, but it’s such a lovely song and dance number that I just had to provide y’all with the audio (and video). 

    Adieu, Bert Cooper.

     

  3. Adieu, Bertram Cooper. 

     

  4. theatlantic:

    The Communist Manifesto, As a Patent Application

    Great books—books that change the way we see the world, books that spur us along our paths as people and cultures—are, in their way, patents. They are innovations made manifest. They are ideas that are claimed by an author on behalf of the rest of us. They are cultural products that concern themselves, when they are at their very best, with hammocks

    The artist and developer Sam Lavigne has taken these connections to a delightfully logical conclusion. Over at github, he posted a program that renders texts—literary, philosophical—as patent applications. “In short,” Lavigne explains, “it reframes texts as inventions or machines.” 

    So! Kafka’s The Hunger Artist becomes “An apparatus and device for staring into vacancy.” Heidegger’s The Question Concerning Technology becomes “A device and system for belonging to bringing-forth.” And—my personal favorite—​The Communist Manifesto becomes “A method and device for comprehending theoretically the historical movement.”

    Read more. [Image: Sam Lavigne]

     

  5. faultinourstarsmovie:

    One note = one vote. Like or reblog to vote for your state! Go Maine! http://thefaultinourstarsmovie.com/demandourstars